SCREENING MADNESS

March Is Colorectal Cancer Awareness Month

March is Colorectal Cancer Awareness Month. Throughout the month, the Blue Hat Foundation in partnership with the Big Ten Cancer Research Consortium and the University of Illinois Cancer Center are teaming up to increase awareness of the importance of colorectal cancer screening. If you or your loved one are age 45 or older, now is the time to act if you have not been screened.

 

SCREENING RESOURCES

The Focus of Our Efforts

UI Health Cancer Center

At the UI Cancer Center, we are dedicated to helping our patients and community members catch cancer before it can enter the later stages where it grows and spreads. That’s why we offer many types of cancer screening services at UI Health/Mile Square.

Teaming Up to Fight Cancer

March is Colorectal Cancer Awareness Month. Throughout the month, the Big Ten Cancer Research Consortium and the Blue Hat Foundation are teaming up to increase awareness of the importance of colorectal cancer screening. If you or your loved one are age 45 or older, now is the time to act if you have not been screened.
Please join us by taking three steps that could make all the difference for you or your loved one. Screening saves lives!

 

Colorectal Cancer Facts

 
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What is colorectal cancer?

for more information go to www.cancer.org

Colorectal cancer, also called colon cancer or CRC for short is cancer that occurs in the colon or rectum. The colon is the large intestine that is part of your digestive system.

45

Recommended Screening Age

The American Cancer Society and The USPSTF have now recommended screening for colorectal cancer to start at age 45.  Talk to your medical professional about what screening options are right for you.

53,000

Will Die From Colorectal Cancer

In 2021, it is estimated that 104,270 will be diagnosed with colon cancer, and 45,230 will be diagnosed with rectal cancer. Data from the American Cancer Society www.cancer.org

1 in 24

People Will Be Diagnosed With Colorectal Cancer

Overall, the lifetime risk of developing colorectal cancer is: about 1 in 23 (4.3%) for men and 1 in 25 (4.0%) for women.

24%

African American Males

Are more likely to get colorectal cancer compared to Caucasian men.

47%

African American Men

More likely than Caucasian men to die from colorectal cancer.

20%

African Americans

African Americans have the highest colorectal cancer incidence and mortality rates of all racial groups in the US. The reasons for this are not fully understood. Jews of Eastern European descent (Ashkenazi Jews) have one of the highest colorectal cancer risks of any ethnic group in the world.

40%

Overall, African Americans are about 20% more likely to get colon cancer and 40% more likely to die from it than most other groups.

Signs and symptoms

  • No symptoms at all (this is most common)

  • Blood in stool

  • Fatigue

  • Anemia

  • Feeling bloated

  • A change in bowel movements

  • Abdominal cramping or pain

  • Unintentional weight loss

1 in 3

1 in 3 people (with or without insurance) are not up to date with colon cancer screening.

Risk factors:

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Screening options

  • Colonoscopy (recommended)

  • Flexible sigmoidoscopy

  • Home stool-based test (FIT, gFOBT, DNA-Cologuard)

  • Virtual colonography

 

The Blue Hat Foundation, Inc

46 E. 26th Street, Chicago, IL 60616

(773)573-2740

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©2023 by The Blue Hat Foundation, Inc. a 501(c)3 organization